Debbi Sherman Web Design + Tech VA
Do I Need GDPR for my Website?

I hear this question a lot, “do I need GDPR for my website?” The answer is probably yes…

What is the EU GDPR?

The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) should be implemented on all personal data collected on European users. This regulation applies to most business and consumer activities where personal data are used.

An effective GDPR compliance policy is easy to add to your website. But it isn’t easy to implement. That’s why I wrote this guide: I want you to have a GDPR policy that works for your business, not just the EU.

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a set of laws that enforce the privacy rights of consumers in the European Union. The GDPR took effect on May 25th 2018 and will eventually cover all companies in Europe, regardless of where they operate or are headquartered.

The GDPR includes new data protection rules for the European Union, including those that are not currently covered by US privacy laws. These include:

  • Personal data must be processed for a “justified” purpose (like marketing, research or protecting public safety).
  • Companies have to have a written privacy policy explaining how personal data will be used and shared.
  • Companies have to inform people they can opt out of receiving targeted ads or special offers.
  • Companies can’t use automated processes to determine which visitors are most likely to buy products or services.

How do I check for GDPR Compliance?

There are a lot of ways to check but my favorite is here: https://2gdpr.com/
 
Do I Need GDPR for my Website?

What is a GDPR Policy?

Every website needs a data privacy policy that visitors need to accept when they visit. The USA doesn’t have a specific policy really – but the EU does.
 
Without a GDPR policy, your website visitors will be left to assume that they can accept or reject your data privacy policies as they please.
 
They may not feel comfortable accepting all of your data privacy policies; some may not feel comfortable at all. Which means that when they click “Accept” on any of your privacy policies, they are saying “I trust you and I won’t tell anyone I didn’t want to accept this.”
 
The answer is simple. All websites should have a GDPR policy that visitors need to accept when they visit. The USA doesn’t have a specific policy really – but the EU does.
 

Where to find GDPR Policies for your website

In the EU, privacy policies are formulated in the GDPR. This is a new regulation that mandates that all European businesses must have a privacy policy on their website to comply with the GDPR.
 
If you want to ensure you’re compliant with this regulation, you need to be sure that your website is GDPR-compliant and can be found with a search engine (Google or Bing).
 
There are two types of websites labeled as GDPR-compliant: those that have been deemed compliant and those that haven’t – let’s call them unworthy.
 
To find out if your website falls into this category, look for “GDPR” on a search engine like Google or Bing.
 

How do I create a GDPR Policy for my website?

 
The first thing you need to do if you want your website fully GDPR compliant is to update your web host software so that it can accept the GDPR privacy policy when visitors are browsing from any location in Europe, and so that it can display a notice when visitors leave your site who can opt out of having their personal data collected and processed in any way relating to GDPR compliance.
 

So To Wrap it Up

If you’re an American company, then you’re probably already familiar with the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which is a new set of European data regulations that took effect on May 25, 2018.

The GDPR replaces the 1995 EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC), which was adopted in response to fears of privacy breaches and government surveillance. ASK yourself, why would you want to add a GDPR policy to your website now?

There are several reasons:

If you are an American company, you’re probably already familiar with the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which is a new set of European data regulations that took effect on May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the 1995 EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC), which was adopted in response to fears of privacy breaches and government surveillance.

For example, you may have been asked by employees to remove personal information when they leave their job, or if they take a vacation or go on holiday — because they no longer need your personal information while they are away from home.

You may have recently received legal threats from governments around the world as they try to regulate how companies use personal data — like Facebook’s recent move to scrap its controversial “news feed” algorithm—where users can see what their friends’ friends like and post updates about their own lives.

If you are an American company. You’re probably already familiar with the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). The regulation replaced the 1995 EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC), which was adopted in response to fears of privacy breaches and government surveillance Several countries around the world have passed similar regulations but only two were enforced by most countries: the UK (which has implemented its own “general” data protection agency) , China and Russia . Under the new regulation, companies must establish proper internal controls for all personal data that is processed on their behalf, including basic information about who has access to it as well as how it will be protected from misuse or unauthorized processing .

Many companies don’t know exactly how this will affect their business because no one anticipated it – at least not until now! Many companies don’t know exactly how this will affect their business because no one anticipated it – at least not until now! If your company operates in Europe or other parts of the world where there are similar local laws and regulations , you should already be aware of them. 

do I need gdpr
Do I need GDPR for my website?

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